What should I use to lube my airsoft gun?

11/11/2010 12:55

 

    If you have been airsofting for any amount of time, you have probably heard of the debate on whether or not silicone oil is the only oil you should use to lubricate your airsoft weapon. I thought the article below was quite helpful on the subject.

 

Article by OpSic66 from http://www.airsoftforum.com/
Edits by Striker

No, not all lubricants are the same. This is definitely true for silicone sprays.

No, not all of them are "safe" for airsoft use.

NO WD-40, liquid wrench, PB Blaster, etc... or real steel gun products! (thanks BroodRed, I forgot this one)


What do you need to know, or do about this [?] - Well, read below.


Silicone spray lube: Generally any should work.....
Provided - it does not contain any: petroleum distillates, petroleum by-products, Hydro-Carbons, or any harsh petroleum based products,
Such as: Hexane, Heptane, Toluene, Xylene, Ethylene, Xylol, Toluol, Naphtha, benzene or any other flammable substance! (aside from the propellants listed below).

If it is using ISO-Butane, or propane "as a propellant", that is fine.

Silicone Grease: (paste, non aerosol, whatever.. - This also goes double for ANY other type of grease.)
Again, you want grease without the same chemicals listed.
Does not contain any: petroleum distillates, petroleum by-products, Hydro-Carbons, or any harsh petroleum based products, Such as: Hexane, Heptane, Toluene, Xylene, Ethylene, Xylol, Toluol, Naphtha, benzene or any other flammable substance!

Recommended Lubes and Greases:

Permatex dielectric grease. From AutoZone its 100% silicone, and 5.99 a tube. Great for cylinder/air seal components. (Thanks GoLgo 13)
Permatex white lithium grease. Again from AutoZone in a tube for $2.99, works great for gears.
STTi Silicone Spray Lube. From your local Airsoft shop, or even online, Amazon carries it too!

Personally I Swear by "Team Associated - Green Slime". It is meant as a silicone based shock lube, for silicone oil filled shocks. This stuff is $2.50 a tube available at most hobby stores, or online. I use it for EVERYTHING. Gears, O-Rings, Piston, Piston head.. Etc. I have found there is NO [problem] in doing so. I tore down my CA M15A4 @ 1100 rounds, to upgrade its spring, and piston head. I used this grease. That was over 35,000 rounds ago. All the gun has ever seen is a teardown, cleaning, and re-lube.
Tower Hobbies $2.39 a tube. or RC Planet $2.35 a tube. (Editors Note: all prices valid as of June 10, 2008)


Something for everyone to think about... CRC's 808 "Pure Silicone Spray Lube" is:....
30-60% Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG),
30-60% NAPTHA, You should know this is what "ronsonol" lighter fluid is made of.
10-30% Silicone. […] .... Pure silicone spray my […]

What this means to you is: The petroleum byproducts, distillates, etc... They are used in the manufacture process of many plastics and rubbers. While this is not any news of shock value. What do you think will happen when you expose an item (hop up rubber, etc.) to the same chemicals used to manufacture it. Yep, you got it. It's going to change it! And not in a good way either.

While I am not completely against the use of Lithium Grease (specifically the thinner "White Lithium") variety. I believe it needs to be pointed out that it IS hygroscopic. Meaning it WILL absorb water. The bad part of this is, in doing so, the oil used to blend and thin it down gets displaced. This allows the lithium grease to thicken into a very thick paste and basically cause binding.

Also, Silicone lubricants are based off of "weight" (a.k.a thickness). You will find everything from "0 weight" spray silicone, to upwards of 45wt shock oil. -=- I do NOT recommend using Silicone OIL's (be it spray, or drip bottle) varieties in the gearbox. Only Silicone Grease!

 

Editors Disclaimer: Neither OpSic66, airsoftforum.com, wolverinecommandos.webnode.com or any of their affiliates can be held responsible for the contents of this article. Any action(s) you take as a result of reading this article you take of your own choice and at your own risk.

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